MODERN ART

 
 
MAKEUP

Designers and makeup artists pull inspiration from the art world’s heavy hitters on the regular — think the painterly eye makeup at Chanel spring ‘14 and Lisa Perry’s playful, Jeff Koons-inspired frocks. When these worlds collide, the real fun happens — daring and sometimes eccentric looks are born.

Before starting The Formula, I studied painting in college and used to work in NYC’s art galleries including Fredericks & Freiser, Marlborough Gallery, and a pop up exhibition with Vladimir Roitfeld. My passion for art and makeup run head to head, so I decided to combine the two in a recent story for Refinery29. Paying homage to some wildly inspiring exhibits opening in the fall, I created three equally eccentric makeup looks.

The first look draws inspiration from Iconic photographer Helmut Newton. His sleek and sexy take on femininity inspired Jason Wu’s spring 2013 collection, and his notorious red-lipped models inspired Poppy King and House of Exposure to launch the limited-edition Helmut Red shade last year. Newton’s photographs have been making the international rounds with shows in Paris, New York, and most recently at Stockholm’s Fotografiska Museum. My own Newton-inspired look has a striking red lip. How could it not?

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Step 1: Apply a matte foundation like Armani Luminous Silk.

Step 2: Using a brow pencil that’s a shade darker than your eyebrows, fill in the gaps and create a strong straight brow.

Step 3: Line your upper lash line with a black liquid liner, like Marc Jacobs Magic Marc’er. Create a subtle drooping wing to extend the shape of your eye.

Step 4: Finish the look with a bold red lipstick, like Urban Decay in F-Bomb.

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Roy Lichtenstein’s bright palette of primary colors screams Pop Art. I looked to his work for my second look. His use of color-blocking and famed cartoon-style characters are in most major modern art collections. This fall, the Centre Pompidou in Paris features an exhibition of his work.

Step 1: Use a yellow eyeshadow to give a splash of saturated color from your lash line to your crease.

Step 2: Apply a soft blue shade under the arch of your brow.

Step 3: Now the fun begins! Using a black liquid liner, slowly fill in the space between the yellow and blue shadow — this does not have to be even.

Step 4: Line your upper lash line with the liner and draw a droopy wing to create a cat-eye outline.

Step 5: Apply mascara on both your upper and lower lashes.

 

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I die for British artist Cecily Brown’s large abstract paintings. Her work combines figuration with intuitive abstract techniques making for some seriously gorgeous masterpieces. This fall, Brown has an exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery on Madison Avenue. Brown crafts varied textures, shapes and shades using a minimal palette. In my favorite painting of Brown’s, Service de Luxe, she creates a surreal canvas of pink tones. I tried to a Cecily Brown-inspired eye look, drawing from her technique.

Step 1: Select four pigments that are different shades of pink. I used Make Up For Ever Pure Pigments in Fuchsia and MAC Pigment in Cheers My Dear, Pink Pearl, and Fuchsia.

Step 2: Wet an eyeshadow brush ever so slightly, then blot the brush before dipping it into the first pigment. You don’t want to make the pigments runny or you’ll end up with one, big, neon mess.

Step 3: Continue to add colors to your eyelid until it’s fully covered. I suggest using one brush for each color to ensure the shades retain their own intensity, which will add dimension to the final look.

Step 4: Apply a thin line of brown liner to your inner waterline and upper lash line.

Step 5: Finish with a coat of mascara on your upper lashes.

Photos by Anna Granberg in Stockholm; Makeup by Michaela Myhrberg 

-Slide 1-Helmut Newton, Polaroids; Photo Courtesy of: Taschen.

-Slide 2- Roy Lichtenstein, Maybe [P-Peut-être], 1965 Huile et Magna sur toile 152,4 x 152,4 cm, Museum Ludwig, Cologne Schenkung Ludwig; Photo courtesy of: Estate of Roy Lichtenstein New York / ADAGP, Paris, 2013

-Slide 4-Cecily Brown,
Service  de Luxe, 1999,
Oil on linen
75 x 75 in. (190.5 x 190.5 cm); Photo Courtesy of: The Rubell Family

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